Math Sequencing and Dyslexia

Students with slower processing speeds or executive-function problems are often no different from their peers in math proficiency in first and second grade; but as they confront multistep computations in upper elementary school tests, their scores tumble because they lack the skills necessary to produce organized, efficient output.  These students aren’t losing their earlier skill base.  New tasks demand efficient processing in different domains.  The mathematics problems they now encounter need organizational skills involving planning and sequencing, as well as skills like handwriting, copying text, note taking, and other outputs requiring accuracy and efficiency [Emphasis mine]. These skills are often difficult for dyslexic students.  Students who struggle with processing multistep problems can improve their accuracy by employing several strategies that involve “walking” and “talking” problems through.(Woodin)

Possible solutions:

  • Visual Organizers
  • Flow charts
  • Digital Recorders
  • Math writing software

Woodin, Chris. “Math Processing Breakdowns * The Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity.” N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Sept. 2015.